Le Poulet en Civet Au Vieux Bourgogne (Ragout of Chicken with Onions, Bacon and Mushrooms)

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This isn’t the most colourful dish and certainly feels very dated with its boiled onions. I think the best part of this dish is the garlic toast, which I suppose isn’t the greatest compliment. It calls for marc de Bourgogne a type of french brandy made out of the pulp and stems of the grapes after they have been pressed. It is a rather expensive alcohol (I was able to find a bottle for 50 dollars, the next up being over a hundred) and it tastes like straw. I would recommend simply using cognac or brandy to flambe the chicken (it might taste better too).

Boeuf a la Bourguignonne (Beef Stew Burgundy Style)

Everyone’s heard of a ‘Beef Burgundy’ stew but I wonder how many people have actually tasted one or tried to make it themselves. I think this dish is supposed to be an example of a more working class dish in the book but with the price of Burgundy wines, I wouldn’t exactly call this an economy dish. What it is, is an incredibly tasty stew that you just want to keep eating again and again. One of the interesting attributes to this recipe is that it isn’t exactly a one pot meal. The potatoes and mushrooms are both prepared separately and added only close to the end of the dish which creates a greater diversity of flavours and less homogenization. Straining the sauce at the end is another little detail which elevates the dish that much more. This is without a doubt one of the best beef stews I’ve ever eaten, and I’ll definitely be going back to it again!